Tag Archives: stretching

Sore??? 5 Must Include TRX Pre-Workout Stretches

By: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled, CPT/CIFT/TRX II

Understanding what exactly is a TRX?, would be critical before attempting its’ exercises or passive range of motion stretches. Born in the Navy SEALs, Suspension Training (#TRX) bodyweight exercise develops strength, balance, flexibility and core stability simultaneously.

The TRX Suspension Trainer:

  • Delivers a fast, effective total-body workout
  • Helps build a rock-solid core
  • Increases muscular endurance
  • Benefits people of all fitness levels (pro athletes to seniors)
  • Can be set-up anywhere (gym, home, hotel or outside)

By utilizing your own bodyweight, the TRX Suspension Trainer provides greater performance and functionality than large exercise machines costing thousands of dollars, as it is all #Core all the time.

These 5 TRX stretches will change your outlook on stretching and not to mention, better prepare you for your workout.

1) TRX lunge with R/L torso twists (Strap length: long, facing away from anchor point)

  • Stand tall facing away from the anchor point, feet placed shoulders width apart. Right leg steps forward and left hand reaches high toward the right as to create torso rotation. Hold for 20 seconds. Return to standing and then repeat with the left leg and right arm.

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2) TRX lower Back Stretch (Strap length: mid-length, facing to)

  • Stand tall shoulders width apart, shoulders pulled back, chest out and hands placed palms down on the handles.
  • Depress and fall into your gluteus moving posteriorly as you create a hinge looking like a side laying V (>). Hold for 20 seconds. Return to standing.

Low back 1low back 2

3) TRX hip hinge with offset stance (Strap length: mid-length, facing to anchor point)

  • Stand tall, slightly wider than shoulders width apart, shoulders pulled back, chest out and hands placed palms down on the handles.
  • Depress and fall forward to the anchor point hinging your lower back and torso, keeping the legs fully extended as to elongate the hamstrings and stretch the lower torso. Hold for 20 seconds. Return to standing.

Hip HingeHip Hinge - 1

4) TRX figure 4, R/L (Strap length: long, facing to anchor point)

  • Stand tall, slightly wider than shoulders width apart, shoulders pulled back, chest out and hands placed palms down on the handles.
  • Place your right leg on-top of your left knee line then lower into a squat. Feel a moderate pull on your hip flexors. Hold for 20 seconds. Return to standing and repeat with left leg on-top of your right knee line.

Figure 4Figure 4-1Figure 4-2Figure 4-3

5) TRX shoulder stretch R/L (Strap length: mid-length/interlaced, facing beside)

  • Stand facing besides the TRX strap. Be sure to check that your interlaced straps are secure.
  • With your right hand placed on the strap slowly lower down through the upper trunk and hips as you allow your shoulder blades to retract and open up the shoulder. Hold for 20 seconds. Repeat with the left hand.

ShoulderShoulder 1Shoulder 2Shoulder 3

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Sources:

https://www.trxtraining.com/suspension-training

5 Must Include Upper Back Stretches

By: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled, CPT/CIFT/TRX II

In our previous posts we have taken a look at some incredible #Muscledeveloping “Back Exercises”. Be sure to check them out @ https://fitnesspropelled.wordpress.com/ . This post will address some upper back stretching exercises that are designed to restore flexibility to the joints and muscles of the upper back. Be sure to incorporate a targeted stretching routine to your workout regimen.  Below are five #UpperBackStretches that you will want to include into your flexibility program.

1) Shoulder Blade Squeezes 

Shoulder Blade Squeezes Begin sitting or standing tall with your back straight. Squeeze your shoulder blades together as hard and far as possible pain-free. Hold for 5 seconds and repeat 10 – 15 times.

2) Extension in Sitting 

Extension in Sitting  Begin sitting tall, with your hands behind your neck. Gently arch backwards and look up towards the ceiling until you feel a mild to moderate stretch pain-free. Repeat 10 – 15 times.

3) Rotation in Sitting 

Rotation in Sitting  Begin sitting tall, with your arms across your chest. Keeping your legs still, gently rotate to one side until you feel a mild to moderate stretch pain-free. Repeat 10 – 15 times to each side.

4) Side Bend in Sitting 

Side Bend in Sitting  Begin sitting tall, back straight, hands behind your head or neck. Gently bend to one side, moving your elbow towards your hip until you feel a mild to moderate stretch pain-free. Make sure you do not lean forwards. Repeat 10 – 15 times on each side.

5) Flexion in Sitting

Flexion in Sitting  Begin sitting tall, with your hands behind your neck. Gently bend forwards allowing your elbows to move towards your thighs. Move until you feel a mild to moderate stretch pain-free. Repeat 10 – 15 times.

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Sources:

Upper Back Stretches – Basic Exercises

http://www.physioadvisor.com.au/8110950/upper-back-stretches-upperback-flexibility-exer.htm

How do you go about preventing and treating running injuries?

Fitness Propelleds’ previous article was all about identifying and understanding some of the more common running injuries. In this article we will provide you with handy tools as to prevent those injuries from occurring and present a few strategies in order to treat injuries that have occurred.

Preventative Components:

1)      Stretching for the task: Examples

  • Dynamic (pre- run):  Leg swings: Hold onto a sturdy object, stand on one leg and swing the other leg forward and back. Do 15-20. Then swing that same leg side to side the same number of times. Each swing should build until your leg is close to its full range of motion.

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  • Static (post-run):  Kneeling hip flexor and hamstring: From a kneeling position, plant the right foot on the ground in front of you, so the leg is bent 90 degrees, with the knee and ankle aligned. Keeping your back straight, press forward into your right hip while keeping your left knee pressed into the ground, stretching your left hip and right hamstring. To increase the stretch to the left hip flexors, squeeze and contract the glute muscles of your left hip.

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2)      Cross Training: Examples (Infuse multiple modalities of training into your regime that will increase aerobic capacity and develop lower extremity stability, mobility and power) 

10 Minute Recumbent Bike Example: 

  • 2 min warm up resistance 4
  • 2 min resistance 8 (burst)
  • 1 min resistance 4 (paced)
  • 2 min resistance 12 (paced)
  • 2 min resistance 8 (burst)
  • 1 min resistance 4 (paced – cool down)

10 Minute Eliptical Example:

  • 2 min warm up resistance 4
  • 2 min resistance 6 (burst)
  • 1 min resistance 4 (paced)
  • 2 min resistance 8 (paced)
  • 2 min resistance 4 (burst)
  • 1 min resistance 4 (paced – cool down)

Treatment Strategies:

  • Every treatment program should always start with a conversation from a trusted medical professional. Rest, ice and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories should be applied to reduce inflammation. A reduction in inflammation improves the range of motion of an injured joint and will speed up the healing process.
  • Follow the re-integration 10% rule once you hit the pavement again. Increase your total mileage by no more than 10% each week.
  • Schedule those ever essential days off as to avoid re-injury and maintain running courses that avoid excessive downhill running.

 

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10 Minute Recumbent Bike Example

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Let us be your one stop shop for fitness.  Check out www.fitnesspropelled.com

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Do you, Foam Roll?

Ever feel as if your body is just dragging into the gym? I know mine is suspect to this feeling.  That’s why in the article “Roll Out to Warm Up” by Susan P. of IDEA Health and Fitness Magazine, it’s especially important to incorporate a warm up routine that wakes up your muscles and prepares them for the workout ahead.  

Foam rolling, is a fresh and effective way to warm up your fascia, causing your muscle tissue to move more freely through the scientific principle of self-myofascial release (SMR).  Your body will respond with energy and vigor as you begin to incorporate foam rolling into your exercise routine. 

Check out the article attached and the four foam rolling warm-ups shown and start incorporating these simple “roll-outs” into your exercise program today.  For more information on “Foam Rolling”, be sure to follow us @ http://www.facebook.com/fitnesspropelled or check out our website @ http://www.fitnesspropelled.com

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