Tag Archives: education

New Study Shows The Benefits Of Working With A Personal Trainer

20150625_151816  Over the course of my career in fitness, it has become obvious to me the benefits that come from using a personal trainer, especially when it is combined with a proper nutrition plan. Clients lose fat, look better, feel healthier and have increased energy. As you can see from testimonials page, my clients also see that benefit.

While I see these benefits on a daily basis when working with clients, a recent study conducted by supplementcritique.com to gauge consumer perceptions of personal fitness trainers reinforces that. The study found that an overwhelming number of people are satisfied with their experience when they worked with a personal trainer. The survey, conducted in the United States, targeted consumers that currently workout at least three times a week.

Key Takeaways:

  •  83% of people that have used a personal trainer were satisfied with the results.
  •   Experience is the most important factor people consider when choosing a personal trainer, with 35% of respondents stating this was their most important consideration

Satisfied Customers

Of those surveyed, 56% of respondents who exercised three times or more per week stated that they had used the services of a personal trainer in the past. Of those that had used the services of a personal trainer as part of their workout regime, a whopping 83% were satisfied with the results, underlining the value that personal trainers bring to those looking to achieve their fitness goals.

1  Of those respondents that had not used a personal trainer in the past, there was a clear understanding of the benefit of using a personal trainer as evidenced by the fact that 68% of respondents believed that working with a personal trainer would help them reach their fitness goals.

Experience Matters

Consumers were asked what the most important factors they would consider when hiring a personal trainer. 35% of respondents said that the experience of the personal trainer was the most important factor followed by 27% of people saying that personality and likeability were most important. 26% of respondents cited cost as being the most important factor they would consider when choosing a trainer to work with.

2

Education

The study asked respondents what they thought was the education level of the average personal trainer. 61% of those surveyed believed that the average personal trainer has less than a college degree. 15% believed that the average education level was high school, while 46% believed that the average personal trainer had some college. 38% believed that the average personal trainer had obtained a college degree. I found this part of the study interesting as I have a B.S in Sports Management from ASU.

3

What is striking about this study is the satisfaction level that people have when they work with a personal trainer. Working with a personal trainer that you can connect with is far more likely to lead to you having success while also increasing your enjoyment level.

The study was conducted in April of 2015 in order to understand how personal trainers are perceived in the marketplace by consumers who make fitness a part of their daily lives. You can view the entire survey by clicking here.

Utilize this information to make an informed decision when hiring a personal trainer and make sure
they address your individual needs not lump you into a “program”.

Visit www.fitnesspropelled.com or simply give us a call @ 480-522-7874 with any questions on getting started with your own training program.

Empowering youth on the Autism Spectrum with a personalized exercise program

By: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled, CPT/CIFT/TRX II

I have always believed in #Contributing which states: “giving something, such as money or time in order to help achieve or provide something” – (Dictionary.com). Through exercise, I knew it would be my medium to create a special bond with young men and women on the Autism Spectrum. Having a broad career of working with youth and young adults on the Autism Spectrum as an adaptive P. E. teacher for years and as a fitness professional with specifically designed fitness programs, that have delivered resounding results, I knew this would be my avenue towards “Contributing”.

Why make a difference through exercise? Exercising is my passion and when you do what you love, you never feel as if it is work. Even better, if you can share your passions with those who otherwise would not normally engage in “exercise”, it becomes that much more meaningful. This led me to create the “Personal Power Program”. Information on this program can be found @ http://fitnesspropelled.com/personal-power-program/1281766 .

The benefits of exercise and positive effects that it has on everyone are numerous but we are just beginning to learn the effects exercise has on those on the Autism Spectrum. Below are just a few of the reasons why we must engage our youth and young adults on the Autism Spectrum into a fitness experience that works for them!

– Exercise reduces problem behaviors such as repetitive behaviors, off-task behavior, mouthing, self-injury, disruptiveness and aggression in those with autism.

– Exercise increases the release of several brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. These include endorphins and dopamine, which affect our brain’s functioning.

– Exercise can help the entire body, including the brain, function at its best.

– Exercise improves attention, concentration and organizational skills.

– After just 20 minutes of exercise children showed improved behavior, thinking skills and school performance.

By sharing, liking and connecting with Fitness Propelled, we can all #contribute towards a healthier and more meaningful tomorrow.

Website: http://www.fitnesspropelled.com

Follow us on Twitter @ FPropelled – https://twitter.com/FPropelled

Like us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/FitnessPropelled

Pin and follow us @ http://www.pinterest.com/FitNsPropelled/

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUeuNEGlf9yilJ6Yd-pI5XQ/feed

View us on Yelp @ www.yelp.com/biz/fitness-propelled-llc-scottsdale

 

Sources:

– Daniel Coury, MD, medical director of Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network
– Google/images

 

4 Essential Hydration Tips for Runners

By: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled, CPT/CIFT/TRX II

Runners are well aware of the importance on staying hydrated to run their best, especially in the heat of summer. “Being more than two percent dehydrated in warm environments causes a decline in performance,” says Robert W. Kenefick, Ph.D., a physiologist with the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine.

Keep fluids nearby by stashing a water bottle in a gym bag or leave sports drink in your car. However, to improve performance, you need to be more than a casual sipper. A number of recent studies offer runners smarter ways to stay hydrated while also giving their running a boost. Here is how you can apply some of these strategies to your own hydration plan and boost your running performance.

PRE-HYDRATE TO RUN FAST

WHY: In a study in the April 2010 Journal of Athletic Training, runners who started a 12K race dehydrated on an 80°F day finished about two and a half minutes slower compared to when they ran it hydrated. Dehydration causes your blood volume to drop, which lowers your body’s ability to transfer heat and forces your heart to beat faster, making it difficult for your body to meet aerobic demands.

DRINK UP: Drink eight up to 16 ounces one to two hours before a run. “Sports drinks and water are good choices”, says running coach Cassie Dimmick, R.D. Iced coffee and tea are fine, too. Should you have forgotten to consume those liquids beforehand, fifteen to 30 minutes before going out for that run, drink at least four to eight ounces of fluids.

GO COLD FOR LONGER RUNS

WHY: In a study published in 2008 in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, cyclists who drank cold beverages before and during their workout exercised nearly 12 minutes longer than those who drank warm beverages. And in a study published this year, runners who had an ice slushy ran about 10 minutes longer than when they had a cold drink. In both cases, the drink that was colder lowered body temperature and perceived effort, allowing participants to exercise longer.

DRINK UP: Before hitting the pavement for a hot run, have a slushy made with crushed ice and your favorite sports drink. To keep drinks chilled while you run, fill a bottle halfway, freeze it, and top it off with fluid before starting.

STAY ON SCHEDULE

WHY: According to a study in the July 2009 Journal of Sports Sciences, when cyclists recorded their plan for hydrating during workouts—including exact times and amounts—they drank more frequently and consumed more fluid midworkout than their nonplanning peers. “Planning helps people remember how much and when they need to drink,” says lead author Martin Hagger, Ph.D., of the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom.

DRINK UP: Note or write down your thirst during your runs, and write down how often and how much you drink. Review your notes to help you plan when to drink. Set your watch to beep every 15 minutes as a reminder to consider your thirst. “Drinking smaller amounts at regular intervals can help you absorb fluid more effectively,” says Dimmick, “

JUST HAVE A SIP

WHY: Don’t feel like chugging down a gallon of Gatorade? You don’t have to. According to a study in the April 2010 Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, runners who rinsed their mouths with a carb solution right before and every 15 minutes during hour-long treadmill sessions ran faster and about 200 meters farther than those who rinsed with a placebo. “Carbs trigger reward centers in the brain,” says Ian Rollo, Ph.D., one of the study’s authors. The brain senses incoming energy “which may lower the perceived effort,” he says.

DRINK UP: For shorter runs when you want the benefits of a sports drink minus the extra calories, drinking a swish just might do the trick. It is also good news for runners who get queasy from ingesting a lot of sugar at once. But for runs over an hour, find a drink you can stand to swallow (see “What’ll You Have?” below).

RUNNING TIME GUIDELINES:

Your mid-run fluid needs depend on how long you are running for:

ONE HOUR OR LESS Three to six ounces every 15 to 20 minutes. Water is usually fine. For a tough run over 30 minutes, consider a sports drink to give you an extra boost of energy at the end.

ONE TO FOUR HOURS Three to six ounces every 15 to 20 minutes. A sports drink with carbs and electrolytes will replenish sodium. Prefer gels? Chase them with water to avoid sugar overload.

OVER FOUR HOURS Drink three to six ounces of sports drink every 15 minutes, after which use thirst as your main guide (drinking more if you are thirsty and less if you are not).

POSTRUN Replace fluids, drinking enough so you have to use the bathroom within 60 to 90 minutes post run. Usually eight to 24 ounces is fine, but it varies based on running conditions.

Let us be your one stop shop for fitness. Check out http://www.fitnesspropelled.com

Follow us on Twitter @ FPropelled

Like us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/FitnessPropelled

View us on Yelp @ http://www.yelp.com/biz/fitness-propelled-llc-scottsdale

 

Sources:

Key Hydration Tips for Runners – Karen Asp | Runner’s World

Fuel Your Body Effectively Pre/Post and During Your Running Program

By: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled: CPT/CIFT/TRX II

Our bodies are constantly on the go and we know the importance of what we fuel ourselves with has a direct correlation on the performance of what we can get out of it. Every fitness program emphasizes certain nutritional guidelines, whether you are looking to bulk up, lose weight, or sustain your energy levels throughout your day. Running is no different and requires specific nutritional guidelines in order to sustain pace, increase distances and derive marked improvements in speed/time. Below, we will emphasize a few critical nutritional components towards improving your “Running” program:

Before You Exercise:

Stay away from the snack if you are running for less than an hour. When needing a boost, have 100 calories of mostly carbs, like a couple of handfuls of whole-grain crackers. If you do not have time for a quick snack, drink 8 to 12 ounces of water or a low-cal sports drink such as a Gatorade G2 and get to your run. If running longer, (over 3 miles) eat a combo of protein and carbs, like peanut butter with a banana or apple and multi-grain toast (200 to 300 calories), about an hour beforehand.

During Your Run:

Consume 6 to 8 ounces of H2O or other fluids every 15 minutes to stay hydrated or every mile and a half. When running over an hour, your body will want more than water. Sports drinks give you the electrolytes, fluids, and sugar-filled carbs you need. Recommendations for sports drinks include: Coconut Water, Emergen-C Electro Mix formula. Energy gels are also potential alternatives.

When You Are Done:

Emphasize the need to refuel effectively by eating within 30 minutes post-workout.   This is when your muscles replace their power supply fastest. For example, grab an 8- to 12-ounce glass of chocolate almond milk or a combo of mostly carbs being rice cakes or pretzels, and a combination of fruits. Target your carbohydrate consumption to (75 to 80 percent) with some protein (20 to 25 percent).

Let us be your one stop shop for fitness. Check out http://www.fitnesspropelled.com

Follow us on Twitter @ FPropelled

Like us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/FitnessPropelled

View us on Yelp @ http://www.yelp.com/biz/fitness-propelled-llc-scottsdale

Sources:

Alyssa Shaffer – Fitness Magazine

 

Why Integrate heart rate training into your running program?

ImageBy: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled (CPT/CIFT/TRX II)

I am a runner; however I am not one with a strap tightly fastened across my chest. However, more recently as I progress in my running distances and pace, I wanted to garner an understanding of the basic rationale for wearing a heart rate monitor while running. Heart rate monitors are not essential tools for training, but when used properly, they can be a valuable training aid.

Wearing a heart rate monitor while running provides an indicator of exercise intensity. A heart rate monitor, therefore, allows you to monitor and control the intensity of your running. Starting runners often make the mistake of not sufficiently varying the intensity of their running pace. A heart rate monitor can help you accomplish this variation through monitoring.

To do this, you first need to determine your individual heart rate response to running intensity. Step one is to determine what is called your lactate threshold heart rate. Lactate threshold is a moderately high running intensity — the highest intensity that can be sustained without significant discomfort. At exercise intensities below the lactate threshold, your breathing is controlled. When you exceed lactate threshold intensity, there is a sudden increase in breathing rate.

Strap on your heart rate monitor and jog for two to three minutes at a very comfortable pace. Then increase your pace moderately and sustain the new pace for two to three minutes. Continue this pattern, noting your heart rate at each pace, until you reach a pace at which your breathing rate spikes. You are now above your lactate threshold. Your lactate threshold heart rate is the heart rate you noted at the preceding pace.

Heart rate-based training involves targeting different heart rate zones in different workouts. The most popular zone system is the following:

Zone 1

Active Recovery

<80% lactate threshold heart rate (LT HR)

Zone 2

Aerobic Threshold

81-89% LT HR

Zone 3

Tempo

90-95% LT HR

Zone 4

Sublactate Threshold

96-99% LT HR

Zone 5a

Lactate Threshold

100-101% LT HR

Zone 5b

Aerobic Capacity

102-105% LT HR

Zone 5c

Anaerobic Capacity

>106% LT HR

Each zone holds its own benefits and is appropriate for different types of workouts. Zone 1 is so light it barely qualifies as exercise, and is appropriate on days when you are especially fatigued from prior days’ running and for “active recoveries” between high-intensity intervals. Zone 2 is very comfortable and quite useful for building aerobic fitness, fat-burning capacity, and endurance. Running in Zone 2 more than in any other zone is recommended.

Zone 3 is just a bit faster than your natural jogging pace — that is, the pace you automatically adopt when you go out for a run without even thinking about the intensity. It is useful for extending the benefits of training in Zone 2. Zone 4 is a running intensity that requires a conscious effort to go fast but is still comfortable. It is close to the intensity that is associated with longer running races, and should be incorporated into your training in moderate amounts to get your body used to that intensity.

Zone 5a is your lactate threshold intensity. It is more stressful than the lower zones, so you can not do a lot of running in this zone, but it is a powerful fitness booster, so you will want to do some Zone 5a running each week. The typical Zone 5a workout contains one or more sustained blocks of Zone 5a running sandwiched between a warm-up and a cool down. For example: 10 minutes Zone 2 (warm-up), 20 minutes Zone 5a, 10 minutes Zone 2 (cool-down).

Zone 5b is very intense, but when incorporated into your training in small amounts it will elevate your running performance significantly. Zone 5b is too intense to be done in sustained blocks, so instead it is incorporated into interval workouts featuring multiple short segments of fast running separated by active recoveries. For example, you might run 5 x 3 minutes @ Zone 5b with 3 minutes @ Zone 1 after each Zone 5B interval.

Zone 5c covers everything between the fastest pace you could sustain for a mile or so and a full sprint. It is incorporated into very short intervals and should be used very sparingly in your training because it’s so stressful. You will not want to make the mistake of avoiding it, though, as it is a great way to boost speed and running economy.

The content above contains some basic guidelines for using heart rate to monitor and control the intensity of your running. The biggest limitation of heart rate-based training is that, while heart rate is a good indicator of running intensity, it is not a perfect indicator. Heart rate is affected by a number of other factors, including fatigue level, sleep patterns, psychological state, hydration status, and diet, which make it somewhat unreliable in certain circumstances.

For example, while heart rate tends to be lower at any given pace on a treadmill than it is outdoors, running at any given pace actually feels easier outdoors, and one can also sustain higher heart rates outdoors, possibly for psychological reasons. The relationship between heart rate and running intensity also changes continuously as your fitness level changes, so you need to repeat the lactate threshold test frequently to keep your target zones accurate.

Many experienced runners, including elite runners, train without heart rate monitors, instead they rely on a combination of perceived exertion and pace to monitor and control the intensity of their workouts. The success of these runners is proof that a heart rate monitor is not needed to realize your full potential as a runner.

The most comprehensive indicator of running intensity is perceived exertion, or how hard running feels. Perceived exertion attributes for not only heart rate but also all of the other physiological and psychological factors that influence exercise intensity. You will always want to pay more attention to how hard running feels than you do to your heart rate when running.

Heart rate monitors provide users with important data that can be used towards improving running intensity, duration and speed; just do not use it as an end all.

ImageSources:

Matt Fitzgerald -Running 101: Training With A Heart Rate Monitor

 

Let us be your one stop shop for fitness. Check out http://www.fitnesspropelled.com

Follow us on Twitter @ FPropelled

Like us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/FitnessPropelled

 View us on Yelp @ http://www.yelp.com/biz/fitness-propelled-llc-scottsdale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contribute your strong suits….

ImageBy: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled (CPT/CIFT/TRX II)

Contribute (Verb) give (something, such as money or time) in order to help achieve or provide something. (Dictionary.com). I’ve often wondered how could one person, especially me!, “contribute” to make a difference. Well, it took some internal investigating, but I had always known that through fitness, I could create a special bond with young men and women on the Autism Spectrum. Having a broad career of working with youth and young adults on the Autism Spectrum as an adaptive P. E. teacher for years and as a fitness professional with specifically designed fitness programs, that have delivered resounding results, I knew this would be my avenue to “Contribute”.  

Recently, I took my experience and volunteered some time to teach the teens and youth of Phoenix High Functioning Autism how to jump rope and play a few fun games. When you enter into a room and can see the nerves of the youth group escalating, know that many sensory needs must be addressed and turn an overwhelming consensus of “I do not want to do this” into O my goodness, look I am doing it. Where you can see children sitting off to the side and then engage them in the group and even get a good two thirds of the group to crack a smile. That is a powerful contribution. On behalf of all the youth there that night, I think it’s safe to say, we ALL HAD A BLAST.

I encourage you to respond to this post or connect with myself and Fitness Propelled LLC, where we have a specifically designed personal training program “Personal Power” that has shown to contribute to the empowering of young men and women on the Autism Spectrum. Please let me know how you “Contribute”.

ImageImage

Let us be your one stop shop for fitness. Check out http://www.fitnesspropelled.com

Follow us on Twitter @ FPropelled

Like us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/FitnessPropelled

View us on Yelp @ http://www.yelp.com/biz/fitness-propelled-llc-scottsdale

 

It Is All In The Shoes

ImageBy: Geoff Rubin, CPT/CIFT/TRX II

In the world of running, we could easily say that the most important aspect of hitting the road is what happens to be covering our feet. This is not your article for promoting a certain brand or offering expert insight into “The Magical” shoe for running, but simply meant to create open discussions and commentary about what YOUR personal preference for running shoes are and why?

With an inquisitive mind, I have always wondered, why so many different types of shoes? We see shoe’s that cover so many different foot structures from pronation to inversion, to plantar or dorsal flexion, to overuse of the heal strike, so on and so forth. With so many options out there how does one identify the right shoe? Taking my wondering mind into action, I have used everything from barefoot running, to New Balance, Nike, Adidas, Saucony, and Brooks. From my own personal experience, I have fallen into an allegiance to Brooks running shoes.

Currently, I own a pair of Brooks Pure Flow II’s where my feet take on an average 15-20 miles per week. They feel great, are light and adjust to my high arches and slight ankle pronation. As to share only my personal preference as to get this conversation started here is a review of the Brooks Flow III line from   http://www.runnersworld.com/shoe/brooks-pureflow-3-mens.

ImageImageImage

Should you be new to the running world and are looking for criteria on how to analyze the data that shoe companies represent check out:

 

Let us be your one stop shop for fitness. Check out http://www.fitnesspropelled.com

Follow us on Twitter @ FPropelled

Like us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/FitnessPropelled

View us on Yelp @ http://www.yelp.com/biz/fitness-propelled-llc-scottsdale