Category Archives: Personal training

YOU AND YOUR TRAINER: IT’S A WIN WIN PARTNERSHIP

traintwo  This week on the blog, instead of writing about fitness and fashion, I feel compelled to write about fitness and how it relates to me personally. In sharing this with you it is my hope that you will see exercise and your relationship with your trainer as so much more than just a means to getting into a pair of pants or ready for a family reunion.

Life is not always sunshine and roses – you know that. A lifetime of ups and downs can sometimes leave you feeling beaten up and , sad and maybe like you have no sense of control. I know this has been the case for me, but as far as I can look back the one thing that has kept me from giving up has been exercise.   In all seriousness, no matter what the crisis was, working out has always made me a stronger person physically and mentally and I always felt better after a workout. I felt so adamant about this that I was always encouraging friends, relatives etc. to use exercise as a tool to not only look better but to feel better.   It eventually became clear to me that this was the career for me and frankly, I’m very good at what I do…. because I BELIEVE in what I do. As a trainer I want the best for my clients, I want them to succeed. I leave them feeling great and am happy for them ; high-fives all around! If they are having a bad day, working out with me will be a bright spot because they did something good for themselves and for that hour were in control of their life. When life is chaotic, that bit of control can be just enough to help someone get through the day. In fact, I believe in the exercise-client-trainer relationship so much I hired my own trainer. When I am finished working out with my trainer I feel accomplished, happy and….sweaty!!! All good things! And one of the best realizations is that There is a bond between trainer and client. Each person wants to do the best for the other. An inner strength can pop out of nowhere because you want to do your best and succeed, and that goes for both parties. Working out brings confidence and confidence can get you through a bevy of stressful situations, as I know all too well.

Time to get a little personal, and I’m not doing this to generate sympathy, I’m sharing this because my workouts, my trainer and that little slice of control has been THE thing that has helped me to keep my head up. This year has left me with 2 deceased dogs, a loss of a home and, oh yeah, a soon to be ex- husband….he somehow landed at the end of this sentence (wink wink) . I never saw this coming and there were many times I thought “How can I even work and encourage and be enthusiastic for my clients? How can I function without knowing where I will live and what will become of my life?” The truth is that my clients were the reason I got through it! My clients were my biggest supporters who made me feel important and worthy – I was helping them and that in turn helped me. And the decision to move my body every day, even when I didn’t want to get out of bed, helped me to make sense of what was happening. I was able to see the bigger picture. I took my tired self and started hiking again and getting stronger. A fire was lit and I made it work. I can thank my trainer and my clients for that (and of course my wonderful friends and colleagues). This is a work in progress, but I know for a fact that exercise will keep me on the right track. We have all faced adversity and will continue to do so, but the moral of this story is that if you believe in yourself and your abilities, you will be able to conquer the obstacles and that the best medicine is to take care of yourself by moving your body every single day. When you have a trainer in your corner you know that there is always going to be someone who does believe in you. When life is hitting you hard don’t run in the other direction, instead run through the obstacles! Keep moving and your head will clear and you will be able to make decisions. Speaking of running, we will talk sports bras soon !! HA And don’t forget to high-five your trainer!!!

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New Study Shows The Benefits Of Working With A Personal Trainer

20150625_151816  Over the course of my career in fitness, it has become obvious to me the benefits that come from using a personal trainer, especially when it is combined with a proper nutrition plan. Clients lose fat, look better, feel healthier and have increased energy. As you can see from testimonials page, my clients also see that benefit.

While I see these benefits on a daily basis when working with clients, a recent study conducted by supplementcritique.com to gauge consumer perceptions of personal fitness trainers reinforces that. The study found that an overwhelming number of people are satisfied with their experience when they worked with a personal trainer. The survey, conducted in the United States, targeted consumers that currently workout at least three times a week.

Key Takeaways:

  •  83% of people that have used a personal trainer were satisfied with the results.
  •   Experience is the most important factor people consider when choosing a personal trainer, with 35% of respondents stating this was their most important consideration

Satisfied Customers

Of those surveyed, 56% of respondents who exercised three times or more per week stated that they had used the services of a personal trainer in the past. Of those that had used the services of a personal trainer as part of their workout regime, a whopping 83% were satisfied with the results, underlining the value that personal trainers bring to those looking to achieve their fitness goals.

1  Of those respondents that had not used a personal trainer in the past, there was a clear understanding of the benefit of using a personal trainer as evidenced by the fact that 68% of respondents believed that working with a personal trainer would help them reach their fitness goals.

Experience Matters

Consumers were asked what the most important factors they would consider when hiring a personal trainer. 35% of respondents said that the experience of the personal trainer was the most important factor followed by 27% of people saying that personality and likeability were most important. 26% of respondents cited cost as being the most important factor they would consider when choosing a trainer to work with.

2

Education

The study asked respondents what they thought was the education level of the average personal trainer. 61% of those surveyed believed that the average personal trainer has less than a college degree. 15% believed that the average education level was high school, while 46% believed that the average personal trainer had some college. 38% believed that the average personal trainer had obtained a college degree. I found this part of the study interesting as I have a B.S in Sports Management from ASU.

3

What is striking about this study is the satisfaction level that people have when they work with a personal trainer. Working with a personal trainer that you can connect with is far more likely to lead to you having success while also increasing your enjoyment level.

The study was conducted in April of 2015 in order to understand how personal trainers are perceived in the marketplace by consumers who make fitness a part of their daily lives. You can view the entire survey by clicking here.

Utilize this information to make an informed decision when hiring a personal trainer and make sure
they address your individual needs not lump you into a “program”.

Visit www.fitnesspropelled.com or simply give us a call @ 480-522-7874 with any questions on getting started with your own training program.

3 Must Use Dynamic Abdominal Exercises on the Bosu Balance Trainer

imagesBy: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled, CPT/CIFT/TRX II

Exercise programs that scream effective are often centered on the inclusion of both, dynamic or isotonic routines as well as stable or isometric routines. Dynamic or “isotonic” exercise consists of continuous and sustained movements of the arms and legs which is beneficial to the cardiorespiratory system. When you couple a dynamic exercise with a stable or “isometric” exercise per say a plank, then your exercise routine’s difficulty dramatically increases. Isometric exercises are performed by the exertion of effort against a resistance that strengthens and tones the muscle without changing the length of the muscle fibers.

In the sixth video of our series of abdominal exercises on the Bosu Balance Trainer, this video emphasizes the incorporation of a stable base exercise paired with its dynamic counterpart.

Fitness Propelled’s 3 Must Use Dynamic Abdominal Exercises

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=UUUeuNEGlf9yilJ6Yd-pI5XQ&v=1TBbg2PxAVI

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 Sources:

– Dictionary.com

8 Mobile Fitness Apps That Enhance Your Health and Wellness Experience

By: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled, CPT/CIFT/TRX II

Utilizing mobile apps along with your workout regime is an overall enhancing health and fitness experience that will ultimately lead you towards successfully reaching your goals. It quite simple to pull out your phone, which we all have on us and plug in some data that will help us make healthier decisions as we have that “watch dog” with us. If you’re a numbers cruncher then inputting the results from your workouts is key to tracking improvements and it is much more organized than putting down all that you did on a piece of paper and trying to remember where you put it next time you need that data.

Below are a few recommended Apps for you to check out and start using in the categories of……

  • Walking and Running
  • Home and Travel Workouts
  • Nutrition and Weight Loss
  • Client Communication

Walking and Running

  • WalkJogRun: Touted as the “most accurate” IPhone GPS tracker, clients can follow recommended routes in their area or create their own. The app includes walks, training plans, goal setting and pace management.
  • Charity Miles: This App is a great tool for giving back and all you have to do is accrue miles. The App donates 25 cents per walking/running mile or 10 cents per cycling mile to a charity that you choose that is listed on the App. Charities include Feeding America, ASPCA, and Stand up to Cancer to name a few.

Home and Travel Workouts

  • FitnessGLO: Offers guided, on-demand video workouts that clients can follow, preferably from and ipad or tablet. Videos come in a variety of formats using a multitude of different equipment options, length, etc. Accessing the videos are free but a subscription will allow you to access and store the workouts.
  • PopSugar Active: Includes video workouts, articles, and set scheduled workouts in a user friendly manner.

Nutrition and Weight Loss:

  • Fooducate: Grading food products based on nutrition facts and ingredients this app will provide non-bias based information about the food you are consuming. The app also, scans barcodes to display nutritional details and suggest health alternatives. Users can also receive nutritional tips, search the apps database and track food intake, exercise, and weight loss progress.
  • PACT: Who, doesn’t like to earn money, will if you do like to earn a little extra cash, then PACT might be an option for you. Users commit to weekly goals for exercise, nutrition and fruit and vegetable intake; then they have to prove they are doing it by sending snapshots of what they are consuming. Clients can earn a small monetary value of 30 cents up to $5 dollars a week. However, there is a flip side that if you don’t hold your end of the bargain, you pay PACT anywhere from $5 to $10 per missed activity.

Client Communication:

  • WhatsApp Messenger: This app allows users to send text-style messages without having to pay for SMS texting charges and will work on most smartphones with Wi-Fi.
  • Viber: Send out text, photo, video messages, or call your clients anywhere in the world for free as long as they have it as well.

It is with pleasure to be able to provide readers with useable tools for you to add to your health and fitness toolbox. Utilize these tools as valuable additions to your workout regime on your own or with the assistance of a trainer, however, please do not replace one or the other.

Be sure to connect with us & utilize our FREE fitness resources!

Sources:

– Fitness Technology – Fred Hoffman & Amanda Vogel (Idea Fitness Journal 10/2014)

3 Effective Core Exercises on The Bosu Balance Trainer

By: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled, CPT/CIFT/TRX II

So, why use a Bosu Balance trainer? A Bosu trainer is a balance board that can be used with either side up. Both sides of it 1) the inflatable dome or 2) the flat plastic surface provides different challenges for your muscles due to the instability of the surface. This instability forces our muscles to recruit more muscle fibers and expend more energy while engaging in typically stable driven exercises such as squats, curls and core based exercises. When balancing on you the flat side of Bosu exercises might involve squats, pushups, sit-ups and lunges or when stand on the dome you might incorporate free weights for such exercises as arm curls, shoulder presses and core exercises.

Training on the Bosu Balance trainer carries over to your daily life, where balance is affected by motion. The Bosu trains your body for dynamic balance by coordinating the movements of your left hip and right shoulder, similar to the movement you make when walking. When your opposite hip and opposite shoulder move in a balanced manner, you are steady on your feet when walking, running, or playing sports.

Additionally as you train your balance on the Bosu, your muscles and the receptors near them, become more efficient at positioning your body in relation to the environment. Whether you know it or not you’re working on Proprioception which involves the awareness of your body in the space around you.

 

Fitness Propelled’s 3 Core Exercises on The Bosu Balance Trainer

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wso6NeO_FzY

Routine:
– Bosu ball sit ups: 15 repetitions
– Bosu ball reach through’s: 15 repetitions
– Bosu ball indiv. knee tucks: 15 r/l repetitions

Repeat 3 sets.

 

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Website: http://www.fitnesspropelled.com

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Sources:

Bosu Benefits for Muscles by Lisa M. Wolfe

3 Fast Twitch Muscle Exercises to Improve Running Performance

By: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled, CPT/CIFT/TRX II

Improving running performance is multi-faceted; the aim of this article is to focus on exercises related to fast twitch muscle fibers and explains a general overview of their function.

Fast-Twitch Muscle Fibers:

Type II fibers are involved in any activity that includes a quick explosive movement or the rapid development of power. Most common applicable example would be football players and track and field athletes.   Type II fibers develop more power then Type I or slow twitch muscle fibers because the Type IIx fiber can contract 10 times faster than the Type I fiber. The more adept you become at recruiting your Type II fibers; the more power you can develop. This leads to faster sprint times and decreased mile times for more focused short distance runs.

Two Types of Fast-Twitch Muscle Fibers:

1) Type IIa (Fast Twitch, Oxidative-Glycolytic)

  • High number of mitochondria
  • Can use both fat stores and glycogen stores for energy
  • Resistant to fatigue and recover quickly
  • Good for fast, repetitive, low-intensity activity. Bodybuilders possess high numbers of Type IIa muscle fibers, and research suggests they play a big role in muscle size.

2) Type IIx (Fast Twitch, Non-Oxidative)

  • Low number of mitochondria
  • Large in diameter
  • Fast fatiguing
  • Good for high-intensity, large-power output, such as track/field events and power lifting.

Training for Fast-Twitch Muscle Fibers:

There are a number of ways to increase your ratio of Type II fibers—heavy strength training, speed training, plyometric training and Olympic lift training. Training does a few things:

  1. Hypertrophy or growth of the Type II fibers, increasing their power output.
  2. Help recruit, put them into applicable use of Type II fibers faster.
  3. Change Type I fibers to Type II fibers.

Fast-Twitch Muscle Workouts:

1) Dumbbell reverse lunges with quick switches utilizing jumps:

Preparation:

  • Stand holding a pair of dumbbells at your sides, with your feet shoulder width apart.
  • Ensure you have at least a few feet of clearance behind you.
  • Start with your chest out, head up, and a slight bend in your knees.

Exercise:

Step backward with your right leg, landing on the ball of the foot, then bend both knees to lower yourself to the floor. (Make sure to step back far enough so your front knee is behind the toes at the bottom of the movement.) When your front thigh is parallel with the floor, extend your knees and hips to stand back up to the start position. Alternate legs with jumps or quick transitions every rep.

2) Box jumps w/ kettlebell:

Preparation:

  • Obtain a plyometric box between 12-36 inches, depending on your abilities.
  • Grab a kettlebell where you can do 8-12 repetitions rather quickly.
  • Ensure you have enough room to safely land and clear jumps. Preferably 5ft by 5ft.

Exercise:

Assume an athletic position, with your feet about shoulder-width apart, at a comfortable distance from the box. Start the box jump by quickly getting into a quarter squat while hinging at the hips to engage the hamstrings and gluteus. Place and keep your hands at the crest of the kettlebell, so both hands are holding the bell. Hold the kettlebell close to your chest, just below chin level. Then, forcefully extend your hips, swing your arms and push your feet though the floor to propel yourself onto the box. Focus on landing lightly on top of the box with your knees slightly above 90 degrees with your chest up. Hold for two to three seconds, stand tall, and step back down. Repeat.

3) Deadlift followed by a squat jumps

Preparation:

  • Set an Olympic straight bar on the ground and load it with appropriate weight.
  • Ensure your space is clear and that you have enough room to work.

Exercise

Stand with feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart, toes pointing straight ahead or slightly outward (no wider than 11 and 1 o’clock). The balls of the feet should line up under the bar. With knees slightly bent and hands gripping the bar slightly outside of legs, hinge forward from hips. With the bar close to shins, keep head up, eyes looking forward, chest out, and back flat. Inhale. Keeping the bar close to the body, exhale as you work to straighten the legs — drive through the heels, not the toes — and bring the weight up past knees. Keep core engaged throughout the entire movement (this helps protect the spine) and finish by thrusting the hips into alignment with the feet and squeezing your glutes. Maintaining a straight back, slowly hinge forward at the hips (allow knees to bend a little at the same time) and lower the bar back to the ground. That is one rep.

For the squat jumps, step back from your deadlifting bar, set your feet shoulder width apart. Lower yourself down to where hips / gluteus is loaded towards your rear. Bring your bottom to knee level and thrust straight up landing tall onto the toes then reset. Repeat.  

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Sources:

Josh Williams – 3 ways to develop fast-twitch muscle

Bill Rom – Workouts That Increase Speed & Train Fast Twitch Muscles

Anton Reid, Demand Media- How to Develop Fast-Twitch Leg Muscles

Google images

 

Empowering youth on the Autism Spectrum with a personalized exercise program

By: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled, CPT/CIFT/TRX II

I have always believed in #Contributing which states: “giving something, such as money or time in order to help achieve or provide something” – (Dictionary.com). Through exercise, I knew it would be my medium to create a special bond with young men and women on the Autism Spectrum. Having a broad career of working with youth and young adults on the Autism Spectrum as an adaptive P. E. teacher for years and as a fitness professional with specifically designed fitness programs, that have delivered resounding results, I knew this would be my avenue towards “Contributing”.

Why make a difference through exercise? Exercising is my passion and when you do what you love, you never feel as if it is work. Even better, if you can share your passions with those who otherwise would not normally engage in “exercise”, it becomes that much more meaningful. This led me to create the “Personal Power Program”. Information on this program can be found @ http://fitnesspropelled.com/personal-power-program/1281766 .

The benefits of exercise and positive effects that it has on everyone are numerous but we are just beginning to learn the effects exercise has on those on the Autism Spectrum. Below are just a few of the reasons why we must engage our youth and young adults on the Autism Spectrum into a fitness experience that works for them!

– Exercise reduces problem behaviors such as repetitive behaviors, off-task behavior, mouthing, self-injury, disruptiveness and aggression in those with autism.

– Exercise increases the release of several brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. These include endorphins and dopamine, which affect our brain’s functioning.

– Exercise can help the entire body, including the brain, function at its best.

– Exercise improves attention, concentration and organizational skills.

– After just 20 minutes of exercise children showed improved behavior, thinking skills and school performance.

By sharing, liking and connecting with Fitness Propelled, we can all #contribute towards a healthier and more meaningful tomorrow.

Website: http://www.fitnesspropelled.com

Follow us on Twitter @ FPropelled – https://twitter.com/FPropelled

Like us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/FitnessPropelled

Pin and follow us @ http://www.pinterest.com/FitNsPropelled/

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUeuNEGlf9yilJ6Yd-pI5XQ/feed

View us on Yelp @ www.yelp.com/biz/fitness-propelled-llc-scottsdale

 

Sources:

– Daniel Coury, MD, medical director of Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network
– Google/images