Category Archives: core conditioning

YOU AND YOUR TRAINER: IT’S A WIN WIN PARTNERSHIP

traintwo  This week on the blog, instead of writing about fitness and fashion, I feel compelled to write about fitness and how it relates to me personally. In sharing this with you it is my hope that you will see exercise and your relationship with your trainer as so much more than just a means to getting into a pair of pants or ready for a family reunion.

Life is not always sunshine and roses – you know that. A lifetime of ups and downs can sometimes leave you feeling beaten up and , sad and maybe like you have no sense of control. I know this has been the case for me, but as far as I can look back the one thing that has kept me from giving up has been exercise.   In all seriousness, no matter what the crisis was, working out has always made me a stronger person physically and mentally and I always felt better after a workout. I felt so adamant about this that I was always encouraging friends, relatives etc. to use exercise as a tool to not only look better but to feel better.   It eventually became clear to me that this was the career for me and frankly, I’m very good at what I do…. because I BELIEVE in what I do. As a trainer I want the best for my clients, I want them to succeed. I leave them feeling great and am happy for them ; high-fives all around! If they are having a bad day, working out with me will be a bright spot because they did something good for themselves and for that hour were in control of their life. When life is chaotic, that bit of control can be just enough to help someone get through the day. In fact, I believe in the exercise-client-trainer relationship so much I hired my own trainer. When I am finished working out with my trainer I feel accomplished, happy and….sweaty!!! All good things! And one of the best realizations is that There is a bond between trainer and client. Each person wants to do the best for the other. An inner strength can pop out of nowhere because you want to do your best and succeed, and that goes for both parties. Working out brings confidence and confidence can get you through a bevy of stressful situations, as I know all too well.

Time to get a little personal, and I’m not doing this to generate sympathy, I’m sharing this because my workouts, my trainer and that little slice of control has been THE thing that has helped me to keep my head up. This year has left me with 2 deceased dogs, a loss of a home and, oh yeah, a soon to be ex- husband….he somehow landed at the end of this sentence (wink wink) . I never saw this coming and there were many times I thought “How can I even work and encourage and be enthusiastic for my clients? How can I function without knowing where I will live and what will become of my life?” The truth is that my clients were the reason I got through it! My clients were my biggest supporters who made me feel important and worthy – I was helping them and that in turn helped me. And the decision to move my body every day, even when I didn’t want to get out of bed, helped me to make sense of what was happening. I was able to see the bigger picture. I took my tired self and started hiking again and getting stronger. A fire was lit and I made it work. I can thank my trainer and my clients for that (and of course my wonderful friends and colleagues). This is a work in progress, but I know for a fact that exercise will keep me on the right track. We have all faced adversity and will continue to do so, but the moral of this story is that if you believe in yourself and your abilities, you will be able to conquer the obstacles and that the best medicine is to take care of yourself by moving your body every single day. When you have a trainer in your corner you know that there is always going to be someone who does believe in you. When life is hitting you hard don’t run in the other direction, instead run through the obstacles! Keep moving and your head will clear and you will be able to make decisions. Speaking of running, we will talk sports bras soon !! HA And don’t forget to high-five your trainer!!!

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6 Must Include Total Body Medicine Ball Exercises

By: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled, CPT/CIFT/TRX II

In our exploration of multiple pieces of equipment to use while adopting a more #Functional approach to training, medicine ball exercises are an excellent resource. Available in varying sizes and weights, these weighted spheres can help improve muscular power and sports performance. Medicine balls can be thrown and caught making for explosive movements that can improve overall athletic ability.

When choosing the correct medicine ball weight, pick a ball that is heavy enough to slow the motion, but not so heavy that control, accuracy, or range of motion loose control. Set a goal of 10 to 15 reps—or as many as you can do with good form.

Below are @fitnesspropelled 6 total body #MedicineBall exercises.

1) Squat with overhead press

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Stand with feet together shoulder width apart, holding a medicine ball in front of the chest in both hands. Lower down to a squat and on the return to a standing position reach the medicine ball straight overhead into a military press. Repeat.

2) Lunge with a twist

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  • Engage your core, standing hip width apart with shoulders relaxed. Holding a medicine ball a few inches in front of the chest, step forward into a lunge with the right leg. Extended arms, reach the medicine ball to the right, rotating the torso at the same time. Maintain the lunge and return to center. Come to standing, then lunge with the other leg (and rotate to the left this time).

3) Rolling push-ups

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  • Start into #High-plank with a medicine ball under one hand, and lower the chest toward the floor to perform a push-up. Return to #high-plank and roll the ball to the other hand. Repeat.

4) Wall Pass

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  • Find the nearest med ball-safe wall. Stand about 3 to 4 feet in front of it, holding a medicine ball with both hands. Get into an athletic stance, with a slight bend in the knees, and the core engaged. Bring the ball to the chest, and firmly throw it at the wall and catch the ball on its return. Repeat at a steady, yet quick pace.

5) Triceps extensions

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  • Stand in a comfortable stance, with the core engaged. Hold a medicine ball in both hands with the arms extended overhead, inner arms grazing the ears Bend the elbows, lowering the ball behind the head until the arms form a 45-degree angle. Squeeze the triceps to straighten the arms, bringing the ball back to the starting position. Repeat.

6) Roman twists

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  • Sit on a gym mat holding a medicine ball in both hands. To start hold the medicine ball out in front of you with straight arms. Twist the torso to the left and then to the right, reaching and planting the medicine ball on the floor toward each hips side. Repeat.

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References:

25 Must-Try Medicine Ball Exercises – BY NICOLE MCDERMOTThttp://greatist.com/fitness/25-must-try-medicine-ball-exercises

3 Challenging Core Stability Exercises on the #Bosu

2By: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled, CPT/CIFT/TRX II

In order to define our abdominal structure we have to challenge it. Emphasizing challenging core stability exercises on the #BOSU balance trainer is an excellent way to achieve such abdominal definition. Utilizing a #BOSU ball provides a versatile piece of fitness equipment that can be a great addition to any home gym. Developed in 1999 by David Weck, #BOSU stands for “Both Sides Up” or “Both Sides Utilized.”

With a flat platform on one side and a rubber dome on the other (resembling half an exercise ball), it can help you improve your balance and flexibility, sharpen your reflexes, and reshape your body.

As described in the featured article by the Health & Fitness Advisory:1 “The domed side is used for aerobic exercises and athletic drills, and when the BOSU ball is inverted, it becomes a tool for balance training that can be used by almost everybody.”

In the eighth video of our series of abdominal exercises on the #Bosu balance trainer, this video emphasizes the incorporation of supine stability exercises paired with an abdominal isotonic exercise .

Fitness Propelled’s 3 Core Stability BOSU Ball Abdominal Exercises

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JE_eIs7d260

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3 HIT BOSU Ball Abdominal Exercises

By: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled, CPT/CIFT/TRX II

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In order to define our abdominal structure we have to really work for it. Emphasizing dynamic core exercises on the #BOSU balance trainer is an excellent way to achieve such abdominal definition. Dynamic or “isotonic” exercise consists of continuous and sustained movements of the arms and legs which is beneficial to the cardiorespiratory system. When you couple a dynamic exercise with a stable or “isometric” exercise per say our push-up position, then your exercise routine’s difficulty dramatically increases. Isometric exercises are performed by the exertion of effort against a resistance that strengthens and tones the muscle without changing the length of the muscle fibers.

In the seventh video of our series of abdominal exercises on the #Bosu balance trainer, this video emphasizes the incorporation of a stable base exercise paired with its dynamic counterpart.

Fitness Propelled’s 3 HIT BOSU Ball Abdominal Exercises

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqhXHolfMDo

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3 Must Use Dynamic Abdominal Exercises on the Bosu Balance Trainer

imagesBy: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled, CPT/CIFT/TRX II

Exercise programs that scream effective are often centered on the inclusion of both, dynamic or isotonic routines as well as stable or isometric routines. Dynamic or “isotonic” exercise consists of continuous and sustained movements of the arms and legs which is beneficial to the cardiorespiratory system. When you couple a dynamic exercise with a stable or “isometric” exercise per say a plank, then your exercise routine’s difficulty dramatically increases. Isometric exercises are performed by the exertion of effort against a resistance that strengthens and tones the muscle without changing the length of the muscle fibers.

In the sixth video of our series of abdominal exercises on the Bosu Balance Trainer, this video emphasizes the incorporation of a stable base exercise paired with its dynamic counterpart.

Fitness Propelled’s 3 Must Use Dynamic Abdominal Exercises

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=UUUeuNEGlf9yilJ6Yd-pI5XQ&v=1TBbg2PxAVI

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 Sources:

– Dictionary.com

3 Exercises to Boost Your “Oblique”, Ab Centered Workout to New Heights

By: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled, CPT/CIFT/TRX II

imagesDespite the cold, we are all still seeking a defined abdomen. Throughout our sculpting process we work the rectus abdominus, transverse abdominus as well as the often forgotten about obliques. In our newest video we showcase 3 “Oblique” centered exercises that will help you transform those love handles into a defined lower abdomen. Why focus on “Obliques”? Performing the correct oblique exercises, improves the form, function and definition of your core muscles.

Obliques (internal / external) serve as stabilizers, and are engaged in almost every compound lifting movement and almost every physical activity. This pair of muscle is located on each side of the rectus abdominis.

External obliques run diagonally downward and inward from the lower ribs to the pelvis, forming the letter V. You can locate them by putting your hands in your coat pocket.

  • External obliques originate at the fifth to twelfth ribs and insert into the iliac crest, the inguinal ligament, and the linea alba of the rectus abdominis.
  • The external oblique muscles allow flexion of the spine, rotation of the torso, sideways bending and compression of the abdomen.

Internal oblique muscles are a pair of deep muscles that are just below the external oblique muscles. The internal and external obliques are at right angles to each other.

  • Internal obliques attach from the lower three ribs to the linea alba and from the the inguinal ligament to the iliac crest and then to the the lower back (erector spinae).
  • The internal obliques are involved in flexing the spinal column, sideways bending, trunk rotation and compressing the abdomen.

Fitness Propelled’s: 3 Exercises to Boost Your “Oblique” Workout on the Bosu Balance Trainer

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwykHkwvwl0

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Sources:

  • Google Images

3 Must Add “Oblique”, Ab Centered Exercises on the Bosu Balance Trainer

By: Geoff Rubin, Fitness Propelled, CPT/CIFT/TRX II

obliques

When seeking that beach ready body, we often become envious of those with defined lower torso’s. They have that “V” shape, which frame the lower abs for swimwear. Performing the correct oblique exercises, improves the form, function and definition of your core muscles.

Obliques (internal / external) serve as stabilizers, and are engaged in almost every compound lifting movement and almost every physical activity. This pair of muscle is located on each side of the rectus abdominis.

External obliques run diagonally downward and inward from the lower ribs to the pelvis, forming the letter V. You can locate them by putting your hands in your coat pocket.

  • External obliques originate at the fifth to twelfth ribs and insert into the iliac crest, the inguinal ligament, and the linea alba of the rectus abdominis.
  • The external oblique muscles allow flexion of the spine, rotation of the torso, sideways bending and compression of the abdomen.

Internal oblique muscles are a pair of deep muscles that are just below the external oblique muscles. The internal and external obliques are at right angles to each other.

  • Internal obliques attach from the lower three ribs to the linea alba and from the the inguinal ligament to the iliac crest and then to the the lower back (erector spinae).
  • The internal obliques are involved in flexing the spinal column, sideways bending, trunk rotation and compressing the abdomen.

Fitness Propelled’s: 3 “Oblique” Variations on the Bosu Balance Trainer

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8N8ZSVkPbQ&index=1&list=UUUeuNEGlf9yilJ6Yd-pI5XQ

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Sources:

– Sportsmedicineabout.com